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Your mind can make up this world a horrible one to a wonderful one.

But your mind can also make up the home that you more care about into a place that you hate most.

Depression is classified as a mood disorder. It may be described as feelings of sadness, loss, or anger that interfere with a person’s everyday activities.

These are some causes of depression that can happen to you or your friends/relatives

Family history. You’re at a higher risk for developing depression if you have a family history of depression or another mood disorder.

Early childhood trauma. Some events affect the way your body reacts to fear and stressful situations.

Brain structure. There’s a greater risk for depression if the frontal lobe of your brain is less active. However, scientists don’t know if this happens before or after the onset of depressive symptoms.

Medical conditions. Certain conditions may put you at higher risk, such as chronic illness, insomnia, chronic pain, or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Drug use. A history of drug or alcohol misuse can affect your risk.

How you can help a person if he falls in depression

  1. Listen to them

Let your friend know you’re there for them. You can start the conversation by sharing your concerns and asking a specific question. For example, you might say, “It seems like you’ve been having a hard time lately. What’s on your mind?”Keep in mind that your friend may want to talk about what they feel, but they might not want advice. Engage with your friend by using active techniques like

  • Ask questions to get more information instead of assuming you understand what they mean.
  • Validate their feelings. You might say, “That sounds really difficult. I’m sorry to hear that.”
  • Show empathy and interest with your body language. Your friend may not feel like talking the first time you ask, so it can help to continue telling them you care.
  • Keep asking open questions (without being pushy) and expressing your concern.
  • Try to have conversations in person whenever possible.
  1. Help them find support

Your friend may not be aware they’re dealing with depression, or they may be unsure how to reach out for support. Even if they know therapy could help, it can be daunting to search for a therapist and make an appointment.

If your friend seems interested in counseling, offer to help them review potential therapists. You can help your friend list things to ask potential therapists and things they want to mention in their first session.

Encouraging them and supporting them to make that first appointment can be so helpful if they’re struggling.

  1. Support them in continuing therapy

On a bad day, your friend might not feel like leaving the house. Depression can zap energy and surge the desire to self-isolate. If they say something like, “I think I’m going to cancel my therapy appointment,” encourage them to stick with it.

You might say, “Last week you said your session was really productive and you felt a lot better afterward. What if today’s session helps, too?

  1. Offer to help with everyday tasks

With depression, day-to-day tasks can feel overwhelming. Things like laundry, grocery shopping, or paying bills can begin to pile up, making it hard to know where to start. Your friend may appreciate an offer of help, but they also might not be able to clearly say what they need help with.

  1. Be patient

Depression usually improves with treatment, but it can be a slow process that involves some trial and error. They may have to try a few different counseling approaches or medications before they find one that helps their symptoms.

Even successful treatment doesn’t always mean depression goes away entirely. Your friend may continue to have symptoms from time to time.

  1. Stay in touch

Letting your friend know you still care about them as they continue to work through depression can help.

Even if you aren’t able to spend a lot of time with them on a regular basis, check in regularly with a text, phone call, or quick visit. Even sending a quick text saying “I’ve been thinking of you and I care about you” can help.

So be a helping hand for your friends and family

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